Between a visit at the shopping mall and at their real estate agent, Chinese tourists create growth in the U.S.

Chinese Dad in car - China Elite FocusThe number of Chinese tourists traveling the globe has increased significantly for the last ten years, making them the largest group of travelers in the world. Now, thanks in part to a recent agreement between the U.S. and China to extend visas for short-term business travelers, tourists and students, the U.S. could see an increase in Chinese travelers in the near future.

This trend is supported by research from the latest Chinese International Travel Monitor (CITM) from Hotels.com which reveals the U.S. is the second most popular destination for Chinese travelers to visit in the next 12 months (behind France), with popular U.S. landmarks like the Grand Canyon and the Statue of Liberty topping travel wish lists.
The CITM research also identifies that, while cities in Asia Pacific remain the most popular (82 percent of Chinese travelers have visited in the past 12 months), visitors to Europe and America have increased with a year over year growth of 25 percent and 11 percent, respectively. These destinations were particularly popular with millennial travelers, with 42 percent visiting Europe and 29 percent visiting America in the past 12 months.

“The CITM reveals that the United States is one of the top five countries Chinese travelers visit the most,” said Josh Belkin, vice president and GM of the Hotels.com brand. “With tens of thousands of places to stay across the U.S., like distinctive boutiques, spacious vacation rentals and familiar chains, our site and mobile app have the perfect places for Chinese travelers of all ages and lifestyles.”

In 2016, there were 122 million outbound Chinese tourists – four percent more than in 2015 and a massive 74 percent more than in 2011, when the first CITM was published. China is already the largest source of international travelers for many countries – despite the fact only 10 percent of the population had passports in 2016.

“Chinese travelers in the United States tend to be more affluent than those who choose other destinations”, said Pierre Gervois, CEO of China Elite Focus Magazines LLC and Founder of the STC magazine, a luxury travel digital publication in Chinese Mandarin. “Real Estate investment in the United States is now the #1 real reason – and rarely stated in surveys – for affluent and wealthy Chinese outbound travelers, as they have acquired for $100 billion in U.S. Real Estate in 2016”

Source: Chinese Tourists in America Blog / CITM

Advertisements

U.S. Retailers wanting to target Chinese Millennial Shoppers should now use English in their campaigns

Affluent Chinese Millennial Shopper - Gervois Magazine - China Elite FocusThey speak English now (Just in case you didn’t notice).

They are the millennial Chinese travelers in the United States.

They are the Chinese tourists coming to discover the United States of America and to buy high quality Made in USA products.

They are the Chinese businessmen and businesswomen coming to invest in American companies and create U.S. jobs.

They are the smart Chinese millennial entrepreneurs coming to America to create start ups and contribute to America’s leadership in future technologies.

They are the Chinese guests fed up to be disrespected in luxury hotels when asking if they really can afford to pay for a suite when they ask for one and are offered first the cheapest room available.

They are the Chinese businessmen walking into a bespoke suit company in New York City and asking for a hand made in America suit because they also deserve to wear the finest clothes. (No, they are not only interested in “I Love NY” Made in China T-shirts)

They are the Chinese travelers annoyed to be depicted by U.S. marketing agencies as using only Chinese social media networks such as Weibo and WeChat, when they are actually using Instagram, Twitter and Facebook to stay in touch with their U.S. friends and freely discover the world.

They are the tourists who have spent $40Billion in the U.S. in 2016

They are the LGBTQ+ Chinese travelers wanting to be as respected as any other tourist and find safe places to just be who they are.

They are the Chinese shoppers who find utterly ridiculous when Western luxury brands add a dragon or a Chinese symbol on a watch or a handbag and expect that they’ll specifically want to buy this model.

They are the Chinese tourists who are grateful for the warm welcome they have received by American people when they were doing horseback riding or cowboy shooting. (Yes, they are not only obsessed by shopping in large shopping malls but want to discover the various aspects of America’s culture and heritage).

They are the Chinese travelers who are proud of their Chinese cultural heritage and Chinese language, but who also speak English and prefer to read in English original stories about the United States.

They are the Chinese travelers who are fluent in English and understand exactly what some people say about them when they are traveling overseas.

Actually, they are exactly the same as any other traveler in America.

By Pierre Gervois, Founder of Gervois Hotel Rating, Publisher of Gervois Magazine, Hospitality & tourism keynote speaker and expert about marketing to outbound Chinese tourists.

Luxury brands might have forgotten that Wealthy Chinese shoppers also wanted a good service

Bottega Veneta store ChinaKering, the French luxury group, is adapting its sales approach to better cater for increasingly sophisticated Chinese customers, according to group managing director Jean-François Palus.
“We’ve changed the way we conduct our business in China and the way we address Chinese clients when they’re abroad,” said Mr Palus at the Financial Times luxury conference in Lisbon on Tuesday.
“We learnt that a very serious risk is to become complacent, to think that it’s an easy business, an easy customer base, easy to open stores with good products and then people will come in. That was true for a moment but Chinese customers have become sophisticated and highly demanding and we need to adapt.”
Chinese consumers account for more than 30 per cent of global luxury consumption, according to consultant Bain, which is forecast to increase to 35 per cent by 2020.
How much of global luxury consumption Chinese consumers account for, according to Bain, a figured set to rise to 35% by 2020
In the past, luxury houses relied on rapidly opening up stores in China to fuel growth amid rampant Asian demand for their products, but this approach has been undermined by an economic slowdown in China.
In the final quarter of last year, Chinese consumers showed signs of returning, although notably shopping more in mainland China, while tourism in Europe has slowed in part owing to recent terrorist attacks.
In China, Kering is retraining shop assistants and replacing email communication with WeChat, China’s most popular social media platform with more than 800m daily users.
Mr Palus said: “The way the Chinese treat very important clients is different — they have a very candid approach to wealth.”
He pointed to a recent visit to a Gucci store in Beijing where the store manager told him he had hired the daughter of a billionaire to work with clients in the shop “because to talk to wealthy people in China, you need to be wealthy”. He added that bad feng shui in a shop can hurt client traffic.
According to Pierre Gervois, the New York Based Founder and Publisher of the STC magazine, a luxury travel publication for High Net Worth Chinese global travelers “HNWI Chinese clearly signaled about  five years ago that they wanted to purchase luxury goods outside China, to enjoy the full experience of the iconic flagship stores in London, Paris or New York”
“This new trend has not been immediately recognized by luxury conglomerates such as LVMH and Kering, that led to an inflation of store openings in China in the years 2010/2015, with little customer traffic, insufficient staff training, and in some cases damaging consequences in terms of brand image.”, Mr Gervois added.
Kering posted a 31.2 per cent rise in revenues to €3.57bn in the first three months of 2017, lifted by a 34 per cent jump in sales from luxury activities.
Among its brands, Gucci led the way, posting record revenue growth of 51.4 per cent for the three months — the latest sign of improvement under creative director Alessandro Michele. Other Kering brands such as Brioni and Bottega Veneta were doing less well than the likes of Saint Laurent.
Mr Palus said: “The market has become more difficult and the pace of growth has slowed down. In this environment you need to take market share from the competition.”
Kering was not looking at acquisitions, added Mr Palus. “We have so much on our plate with helping our existing brands tap their potential . . . we don’t have enough time to think about M&A.”
He said that Kering was also still adapting to digital platforms. “We need to open ourselves to what’s happening in other industries and other countries. Our industry needs to become less product-centric and become more customer-centric.”

Source: The Financial Times / Chinese Tourists Blog

Heathrow ‘Passenger Ambassadors’ Secretly Encouraging Chinese Travelers to Spend Money at Airport Stores

Chinese woman reading the STC magazineAn investigative report by the United Kingdom’s Channel 4 revealed that Heathrow Airport’s 250 passenger ambassadors—service staff helping travelers at the airport—are actively trying to entice tourists to spend money at airport stores. Passenger ambassadors, who were revealed to earn commission from promoting airport stores’ special offers, were found to often actively pursue Chinese travelers as they are identified as the most likely customer segment to spend big inside the airport.

The Channel 4 report, titled Dispatches: Inside Britain’s Airports, unveils that Heathrow Airport’s passenger ambassadors are responsible for what can be considered unethical behavior. By using hidden cameras and undercover reporters, reporters found that, rather than helping passengers, Heathrow’s passenger ambassadors were eager to nudge tourists toward shopping at the airport’s many stores and restaurants. The Daily Mail, which also sent reporters to the airport to investigate, had one if its reporters ask a passenger ambassador for help to find her gate, only to find the ambassador ignoring the question and instead recommending where to find the “best shops and restaurants.”

In a segment of the Channel 4 report, one of Heathrow’s passenger ambassadors described that after successfully encouraging a traveler to spend money at one of the stores, store clerks would provide information on the amount spent by the traveler, which is then recorded in a terminal. According to the report, Heathrow ambassadors have the target of generating up to 4,000 GBP (US$4,960) in sales every day, with one ambassador claiming to have generated sales for as much as 10,000 GBP (US$12,403) in a single day.

Some airport ambassadors interviewed for the report also admitted to actively targeting Chinese tourists, since they’re perceived as more likely to spend substantial amounts of money in the airport’s retail outlets. The report by the Daily Mail further corroborates this claim and describes one of Heathrow’s passenger ambassadors seen “pursuing a man of Chinese appearance for 100ft, while a couple was forced to ignore another ambassador as she skipped beside them gesticulating outside the Cartier store.”

According to the job description that an undercover reporter received when applying for the job, “the majority of the role will involve interacting with passengers, persuading them to shop if they had not planned to, or encouraging them to spend more by talking to them about offers and promotions.” In contrast, a spokesperson for Heathrow airport described the practice as follows: “We provide fantastic restaurants and stores in order to offset the cost of running the airport, which keeps the cost of air fares down. Passenger ambassadors are an important part of our business, and we expect the team to put the needs of passengers first.”

While some experts interviewed for the investigative piece questioned how ethical it is to use employees who are described as there to help travelers for promotional services, none questioned the legality of the practice.

In the United Kingdom, the growing number of Chinese travelers that the country receives is perceived as a crucial engine for growth in the retail sector, particularly after the Brexit referendum which saw the British pound plunge in value against the Chinese yuan. With countless media reports describing Chinese tourists as “flocking” the country for luxury shopping as the value of the pound dropped, it should perhaps not come as a surprise that sales promoters working on a commission basis actively target this particular customer segment. For airport retail, just like other sectors in the tourism and retail industries, Chinese travelers is a customer segment to be reckoned with—with initiatives that encourage further spending among Chinese travelers potentially extremely lucrative.

Source: Jing Daily / Channel 4

Mainland Chinese shoppers accounted for 75% arrivals in Hong Kong in 2016

Chinese power couple - China Elite FocusShoppers from mainland China contributed 35% of Hong Kong’s total retail sales in 2016, which is up from 15% 10 years ago.

Visitors from mainland China now account for 75% of the tourist arrivals in Hong Kong according to Hong Kong Tourism Board reports, up from 54% in 2006.

Mainland travelers spend an average of 2.7 nights in Hong Kong per trip and spend more than CNY20,000 (US$2,900) each time they visit. And while 5 in 10 visitors buy jewelry and watches on their trips, some visitors who come to enjoy the food (51%) and culture (40%) who spend 10% more during their stay than those who come just to shop.

According to Nielsen’s recent study, Hong Kong covers off on the top 6 reasons that consumers look for when they consider regional travel. Online travel agencies and social media are dominant influencers to mainland Chinese travelers, at 95% and 49%, respectively according to Nielsen.

The Brexit’s One Bright Spot: More Chinese gentlemen getting bespoke suits in London

The STC magazine Sept 2016 CoverA volatile stock market, downgraded credit rating, and plunging pound may be some of the economic woes plaguing the UK after the Brexit vote, but there is one thing that seems set to go up in the near future: Chinese tourist numbers.

According to a recent report in Shanghai Daily, travel agencies are seeing a surge in Chinese travelers booking tour packages to the UK as travel and shopping in the region are set to become much cheaper. According to Chinese travel agency Shanghai Spring Tour, all of its tour packages to Britain have now been totally booked for the summer. Meanwhile, Ctrip has also seen a jump in bookings to the UK.

“An interesting reason for this increase of London travel for affluent Chinese men is the new trend for bespoke tailoring”, said Pierre Gervois, Publisher of the Shanghai Travelers’ Club (STC) magazine, a digital luxury travel magazine for wealthy Chinese gentlemen. “As London is probably the best city in Europe to get a bespoke suit, a growing number of Chinese gentlemen are going to London to see their tailor – such as Benson & Clegg, for example, and take advantage of the favorable exchange rate as well”, Pierre Gervois added.

Advertisement Tower - Gervois Hotel Rating May 2017 featuring Pierre GervoisWith shopping a high travel priority and an acute awareness of where to seek out the best prices of luxury goods and avoid mainland tariffs, Chinese tourists have been known to follow currency fluctuations to get a good deal. This has been one factor in the recent Chinese spending boom in Japan as the weak yen means cheaper prices of luxury goods and premium Japanese brands. When the ruble rapidly plunged in 2014, Chinese travelers and daigou sellers rushed to Russia and cleared out entire luxury boutiques thanks to the cheap prices.

The UK has long been working to attract more Chinese tourists, but its exclusion from the Schengen Area has made the visa application process cumbersome for visitors from China. As groups such as the luxury retailer-led UK-China Visa Alliance have lobbied for easier visa access, the government has made changes such as a two-year multi-entry visa policy for Chinese travelers as well as a partnership with Belgium to grant Chinese visitors with a Belgium-issued Schengen visa access to the UK.

But these efforts for greater EU-related visa access may now be undone, showing it’s not all good news when it comes to Chinese tourism in the post-Brexit UK. UK-Europe package tours could take a hit as participants traveling to both the UK and European countries would have to declare tax-free goods brought from the UK into Europe. This includes not only European countries, but also Ireland, which will now see fewer Chinese tourists entering form the UK.

In the long run, Chinese tourists are risk-averse when it comes to making their travel plans and tend to avoid places seen as politically unstable. The perception of increased political and economic instability could also deter the Chinese real estate buyers who have been flooding to London in recent years.

Source: Jing Daily / TopTier

Major duty-free stores yet to be affected by dwindling Chinese tourists over THAAD deployment

Young Chinese shoppers - China Elite FocusSouth Korea’s major duty-free shops have been operating in the black in recent months despite the number of Chinese tourists declining over the country’s plans to deploy an advanced US missile defense system, industry sources said Monday.

Chinese travel agencies in recent weeks spent sales of tour packages to South Korea as part of the Beijing government’s retaliation against Seoul’s decision in July to have the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense system deployed on South Korean soil later this year. South Korea says the missile system will not target China but only counter threats from North Korea.

HDC Shilla Duty Free said it posted a surplus of 125 million won ($107,982) on 53.2 billion won in sales in January.

It is the first time the joint venture between Hotel Shilla Co. and Hyundai Development Co. recorded a monthly surplus since its opening in December 2015.

HDC Shilla also had 1 billion won in operating profit on 67 billion won in sales in February.

The company suffered 20.9 billion won in operating deficit on 397.5 billion won in sales last year.

Shinsegae DF said its Myeongdong branch in downtown Seoul recorded an operating profit of 1.2 billion won on sales of 75 billion won in January in the first operating profit since last May when the Myeongdong branch opened.

Hanwha Galleria, an affiliate of Hanwha Group, and Doota Duty Free Shop, run by Doosan Group, said they have been improving in recent months with their daily sales surpassing 1 billion won each.

Hanwha Galleria logged an operating loss of 43.8 billion won and Doosan a loss of 30 billion won last year.

The duty-free industry, however, may face tough business conditions in the coming months when the country is expected to receive fewer Chinese tourists in the aftermath of the Chinese government’s retaliation.

“The current geopolitical climate between Korea and China is certainly an issue for Korea’s duty free and retail industry.” declared Pierre Gervois, CEO of China Elite Focus, and Publisher of the STC magazine, a travel magazine in Chinese language.

Chinese clients account for about 80 percent of the sales for South Korea’s duty-free shops, according to industry data.

“We are trying to come up with measures for stainable management of the business while refraining from excessive and cutthroat competition to achieve sales and profits at the same time,” a HDC Shilla official said. (Source: Yonhap)

The Japanese have created a new word to describe Chinese tourists’ shopping sprees

Chinese shoppers - China Elite FocusChina’s voracious consumers have helped to create a new buzzword in Japan, with the term “bakugai” – which translates as “explosive buying” – selected as one of top additions to the Japanese language this year.

Fifty candidates were short-listed by publishing company Jiyu Kokumin Sha for the most popular word of 2015, ranging from new terms from pop culture, anime, politics and sport.

That list was whittled down to two winners, “bakugai” and the new baseball term “triple three,” to describe a .300 batting average with 30 stolen bases and 30 home runs achieved by two players this season.

The baseball phrase will have passed many Japanese by, but the influx of Chinese tourists are unmissable. And their spending sprees are fast becoming legendary among Japanese retailers.

Advertisement Banner Gervois Hotel Rating - May 2017 featuring Pierre GervoisDuring the Golden Week holidays in early October, around 400,000 tourists from mainland China descended on Japanese destinations, spending an estimated ¥100 billion (HK$6.3 billion) in the space of seven days.

Encouraged by the weaker yen and easier visa requirements, Chinese tourists accounted for fully 27.5 per cent of the total consumption by overseas visitors in 2014, according to the Japanese government’s white paper on tourism. And that percentage is likely to increase when the figures for 2015 are released.

And once they are here, they have a clear of idea what they want to spend their yen on.

According to the Shanghai Travelers’ Club magazine, the favorite digital publication of China’s Elite, the most affluent of Chinese travelers plan to spend between US$55,000 and US$340,000 per year in shopping overseas.

A study by the Japan National Tourist Agency indicated that 63 per cent of Chinese visitors purchased cosmetics and perfume, 55 per cent snapped up food, spirits and cigarettes and 52 per cent bought over-the-counter medicines and toiletries.

Perhaps surprisingly, only 37 per cent of Chinese bought electrical appliances – rice cookers and Japan’s famous high-tech toilet seats remain favourites – although they did buy in bulk. On average, a foreign tourist will spend ¥65,000 (HK$4,093) on appliances, but the Chinese splash out an average of ¥88,000 (HK$5,541).

Chinese tourists’ reputation for “explosive” bouts of buying have been played up in Japan’s tabloid press, which have played up reports of stores having their shelves stripped bare and tourists coming to blows over the last remaining items.

In one incident reported, two families became embroiled in a fight in a Kobe department store in August over the last box of disposable nappies.

Japan has become the most popular destination for Chinese tourists this year, with 2.75 million Chinese arriving in the January-to-July period, up from 1.29 million in the same period in the previous year.

Even the devaluation of the yuan in the late summer failed to appreciably slow down arrivals.

To meet growing demand and take advantage of an agreement reached in May between Beijing and Tokyo to permit additional flights, All Nippon Airways is ramping up its services to China and launched a new route from Tokyo’s Haneda airport to Guangzhou on October 25. At the same time, it doubled its present single daily flights from Haneda to both Beijing and Shanghai.

Similarly, the Laox chain of electronics and duty-free stores opened a new store in Tokyo in June specifically catering to visitors from China and further afield.

The new ¥2 billion (HK$131 million) store, in the Shinjuku district, stocks around 50,000 items, including home appliances, watches, cosmetics and household goods, all spread out over 2,100 square metres of floor space.

Source: South China Morning Post. All rights reserved.

Gervois rating banner 02

Luxury Shopping in the United States: the 2016 big trend for Chinese shoppers

Shanghai Travelers' Club magazine Media Kit 2016The Shanghai Travelers’ Club magazine, the Chinese language publication read by China’s Elite global travelers has disclosed its much anticipated 2016 Editorial calendar yesterday. And clearly, Affluent Chinese shoppers love the United States! According to Pierre Gervois, the New York City based Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of this publication “The new generation of Chinese business travelers have clearly chosen the United States as their strategic country for their business browth. We have seen in the past two years a very strong interest from Chinese corporations – and wealthy Chinese invividuals- to invest in the United States. The more they come to the U.S. for business, the more they tend to come back with their family for a U.S. luxury leisure & shopping experience”

But It’s no more just about luxury shopping: Philanthropy and real estate investment are also hot topics. The January 2016 issue will have “Philanthropy in America” as its main feature. “Many Chinese CEO’s residing in the U.S. are willing to create their own philanthropic foundations in America, as they used to do in China. We’ll publish stories to help them to understand how to create a charity organization with all the necessary partners: banks, wealth management advisors & attorneys” added Pierre Gervois.

Driving a vintage 1960 Cadillac on Road 66 is also part of a true luxury American experience. (You can also rent a brand new Cadillac SUV). The march 2016 issue will feature a “Luxury road trip to America” story. Ralph Lauren ripped Jeans, Louis Vuitton beaten up keepall bag, vintage Rolex, Vincent Peach leather bracelet, a motel with neon signs, this is America.

After the success of the September 2015 men’s fashion issue “The Gentleman Traveler”, The September 2016 issue will also feature a Men’s fashion special edition, with in depth stories about America’s best fashion designers. “Having a tailor made business suit made in USA makes a statement for Chinese global business executives” said Tyron Cutner, the Shanghai Travelers’ Club magazine Men’s Fashion Editor.

“Winter Holidays in the American West” will introduce snow experiences in the American West: Colorado, Nevada or Arizona are beautiful in winter time and very desirable destinations for Chinese frequent travelers to the U.S. who had already visited New York and Los Angeles multiple times and want to experience a truly authentic American Christmas time. A lot of opportunities for U.S. luxury retailers to showcase their products and services to their Chinese customers.

Request the 2016 Editorial Calendar & Media Kit of the Shanghai Travelers’ Club magazine here.

Gervois rating banner 02